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Anders Bekeken

Greenland is Melting Faster than Ever by WHOI – Greenland Is Melting by CNN

Geschreven op 23-12-2018 - Erik van Erne. Geplaatst in Klimaat Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The Greenland ice sheet is melting faster today than at any point in the last 350 years, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.

The research is the first continuous, multi-century analysis of melting and runoff on the ice sheet, one of the largest drivers of sea level rise globally.

Lead by glaciologist and climate scientist Luke Trusel of Rowan University, a team of U.S. and European researchers analyzed more than three centuries of melt patterns in ice cores from western Greenland. They then linked this historical data to modern observations of melting and runoff across the entire ice sheet, creating a timeline dating back to 1650.

“From a historical perspective, today’s melt rates are off the charts,” Sarah Das, a glaciologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and co-author of the new study, said in a statement. “We found a 50 percent increase in total ice sheet meltwater runoff versus the start of the industrial era, and a 30 percent increase since the 20th century alone.”

According to the analysis, melting on the Greenland ice sheet sped up in the mid-1800s, shortly after the onset of industrial-era warming in the Arctic. Over the last 20 years, melt intensity has increased 250 to 575 percent compared to pre-industrial melt rates. Across the ice sheet, melting was more rapid in 2012 than any other year and the most recent decade included in the ice core-analysis, 2004-2013, experienced “a more sustained and greater magnitude of melt than any other 10-year period” in the 350-year record, the scientists wrote. See also: Ice Ages Affect Sea Level Rise in Unexpected Ways

CNN’s Clarissa Ward visits Greenland to learn about how quickly the ice sheet is melting and the effect it has on the planet. Greenland’s massive ice sheets contain enough water to raise global sea levels by 23 feet, and a new study shows that they are melting at a rate “unprecedented” over centuries — and likely thousands of years.

The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Nature, found that Greenland’s ice loss accelerated rapidly in the past two decades after remaining relatively stable since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution in the mid-1800s.

Today, Greenland’s ice sheets are melting at a rate 50% higher than pre-industrial levels and 33% above 20th-century levels, the scientists found.

“What we were able to show is that the melting that Greenland is experiencing today is really unprecedented and off the charts in the longer-term context,” said Sarah Das, an associate scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a co-author of the study.

To determine just how fast Greenland’s ice is retreating compared with the past, scientists used a drill the size of a traffic light pole to take ice core samples. The samples were taken from sites more than 6,000 feet above sea level, giving the researchers a window into melting on the ice sheet over the past several centuries.

Melting from Greenland’s ice sheet is the largest single driver of global sea level rise, which scientists predict could swamp coastal cities and settlements in the coming decades.

See also: Greenland Melting (360°) by NOVA – Extreme Ice Documentary by NOVA Online: In Extremis – Iceberg Sculptures Uummannaq Greenland by Ab Verheggen – One degree matters at Greenland by European Environment Agency – Klimaatnieuws: IJs op Groenland smelt sneller en sneller – These Weird, Wondrous Animals Live Under Greenland’s Ice Caps by National Geographic – Chasing Ice by James Balog: The Story of the Earth’s Changing Climate –TED Talks: What’s Hidden Under The Greenland Ice Sheet? by Kristin Poinar – ‘Six Degrees: Too Hot to Handle – TED Talks: Time lapse proof of extreme ice loss by James Balog

4 Reacties

  1. Erik van Erne zegt:

    23 december 2018 om 15:12 | Permalink

    Ice Ages Affect Sea Level Rise in Unexpected Ways

    26,500 years ago an ice sheets covered large parts of North America. This ice sheet weighed down Earh’s crust and regions around the edges bulged up. Melting of the ice sheet caused Earth’s crust to rebound. The ice sheet disappeared 7,000 years ago but the crust is still rebounding today. The regions that were at the edge of the ice sheet are now sinking and experiencing heightened sea level rise. Animation by Natalie Renier, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  2. Erik van Erne zegt:

    25 december 2018 om 18:46 | Permalink

    NASA Animation Shows Arctic Ice Rapidly Depleting

  3. Erik van Erne zegt:

    10 december 2019 om 19:42 | Permalink

    Climate Change: Greenland Ice Melt Is Accelerating

    Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than it was in the 1990s.

    The assessment comes from an international team of polar scientists who’ve reviewed all the satellite observations over a 26-year period.
    They say Greenland’s contribution to sea-level rise is currently tracking what had been regarded as a pessimistic projection of the future. It means an additional 7cm of ocean rise could now be expected by the end of the century from Greenland alone. This threatens to put many millions more people in low-lying coastal regions at risk of flooding.

    It’s estimated roughly a billion live today less than 10m above current high-tide lines, including 250 million below 1m.

  4. Erik van Erne zegt:

    18 december 2019 om 13:46 | Permalink

    Melting Ice: The Future Of The Arctic by DW Documentary

    Climate change in the Arctic is fueling not only fear, but also hope. Sea levels will rise and flood many regions. But the melting ice will also expose new land with reserves of oil, gas and minerals. New sea routes are also emerging.

    The melting of the ice in the far north has given reason for great optimism, as newly-found mineral resources promise the Inuit a better life. But international corporations and self-proclaimed ‘partners’ such as China also have their eye on the treasures of the Arctic. Some even dream of a polar Silk Road. As large corporations position themselves to exploit the treasures of the far north, the indigenous people, the Inuit, are fighting for their independence.

    Our film team spent four weeks with a geological expedition to the north coast of Canada – a place where no human has ever set foot before – and were present at the geologists world’s northernmost spring. A microbiologist with them also collected DNA samples that could help in the development of new vaccines against resistant germs. However, the most important resource in the far north is still fish: Greenland supplies half the world with it, yet it still doesn’t bring in enough to finance necessary investments in its underdeveloped infrastructure. And in Canada, the Inuit are also struggling with their government for the right to share in the wealth of their own land.

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